Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Age-Related Macular Degeneration


Related Terms

  • ARMD
  • Senile Macular Degeneration
  • SMD

Differential Diagnosis

  • Cataract(s)
  • Choroiditis
  • Cystoid macular edema
  • Diabetic macular edema
  • Dry eye
  • Fundus flavimaculatus
  • Hematologic disorder
  • Hypertensive retinopathy
  • Infection
  • Retinal vascular occlusion
  • Serous retinopathy
  • Stargardt's disease

Specialists

  • Ophthalmologist

Comorbid Conditions

  • Blood dyscrasias
  • Neurologic conditions

Factors Influencing Duration

The individual's reaction to treatment, any complications, and the extent of the condition may affect length of disability.

Medical Codes

ICD-9-CM:
362.50 - Senile Macular Degeneration, Unspecified
362.51 - Senile Macular Degeneration, Nonexudative
362.52 - Senile Macular Degeneration, Exudative

Diagnosis

History: Central vision may become blurred, either suddenly or slowly, or be washed out. The individual may find it difficult to read in low light or to read low-contrast material such as newsprint. Letters may appear smaller with one eye than the other. Straight lines may look wavy. Pain is generally absent.

Physical exam: An ophthalmoscope illuminates the eye's interior (ophthalmoscopy) and may reveal changes in the color (pigmentation) of the macula as well as hemorrhages in and below the retina. Tiny white or yellow deposits (drusen) may be seen beneath the macula. The layer of light-sensitive cells in the macula may show signs of thinning as a result of cell deterioration.

Tests: A visual acuity test to determine possible vision loss may be performed. A biomicroscopic (slit lamp) exam may be used to examine the eye's interior. Testing may be done to determine the individual's visual acuity and range of vision. A test card with black and white lines (Amsler grid) helps determine how much central vision has been lost. A special dye may be injected intravenously and photographically examined to analyze structures in the back of the eye (fluorescein angiography). This test can reveal a membrane containing new blood vessels beneath the retina while pinpointing any areas of active bleeding. Retinal photography may also be performed.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor






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